How To Make FoodAllTime Garam Masala

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What Are Spices/Garam Masala

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Spices are known as one of the most remarkable ingredients of the Indian cuisine. Without the spices, the exotic flavours of the Indian food are incomplete and FoodAllTime Garam Masala is a perfect blend of all the aromatic spices.

The spices and the herbs present in FoodAllTime Garam Masala are also a prominent reason why the Indian Food has become so favourite among the people across the globe.

So, in a nutshell, we can say that the Indian cuisine and the spices go hand in hand as the traditional food items of India are incomplete without the seasoning of spices and FoodAllTime Garam Masala is a must have on your kitchen shelves.

Some of these spices have a strong, pungent smell and taste, some others have hotter and sharper taste. Some are enchantingly fragrant; some are mildly sweet and in charming colours.

The Indian cooks use loads of seasoning in different types of shapes and colours. Cinnamon, black mustard seed, golden turmeric, cardamom, chillies, ginger root is the common spices used to cook the Indian dishes. Depending on the type of dishes like vegetable, chicken, fish or red meat, the required spices are added during the cooking time. The great thing about the spices is that different flavours can be extracted from the same spice by using different methods of using like grinding, roasting, adding the whole spice or by combining the spice with other spices.

How Do You Make FoodAllTime Garam Masala With Whole Spices


Garam Masala is better when made with whole spices that have been roasted and ground.

For my cooking, I prefer to make my own FoodAllTime Garam Masala. The aroma it lends to my cooking is simply awesome and I don’t need spoonfuls of it.

My husband and my children are foodies and they just love the way I cook. Just a tiny bit of it in the meals especially nonveg is enough to set the stomachs growling with hunger at my home.

I am not a great chef but then I have a friend that aids my cooking and that is my very own FoodAllTime Garam Masala. Mix cumin, coriander, cardamom, pepper, cinnamon, cloves, and nutmeg in a bowl.

You are free to make additions and deletions in the recipe should you desire to do do. The composition of garam masala differs regionally. With so many people in India, it is but natural that everyone has his own way with the recipe of the Garam Masala. Many recipes in the Indian subcontinent cater to regional and personal taste, and each is authentic in its own way. A typical Indian version of garam masala contains:

  • Black and white peppercorns
  • Cloves
  • Cinnamon or cassia bark
  • Mace
  • Nutmeg
  • Dry Ginger Root
  • Black and green cardamom pods
  • Bay leaf
  • Cumin
  • Coriander

foodalltime garam masala

Printable Recipe Of FoodAllTime Garam Masala

FoodAllTime Garam Masala

For my cooking, I prefer to make my own FoodAllTime Garam Masala. The aroma it lends to my cooking is simply awesome and I don’t need spoonfuls of it. The flavours of the FoodAllTime Garam Masala should be carefully blended to achieve a balanced effect, or a single flavour may be emphasized. A masala may be roasted before use to release its flavours and aromas and to prevent infestation of fungus or moulds. The components of the mix are roasted, ground together and then preserved in airtight containers

Course Main Course
Cuisine Indian
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 5 minutes
Total Time 15 minutes
Servings 4 months
Author Ranjeeta Nath Ghai

Ingredients

  • 25 grams black pepper or 4 teaspoons
  • 10 grams cloves or 2 teaspoons
  • 20 grams large cardamom or 2 teaspoon
  • 10 grams small cardamom
  • 5 tbsp cumin seeds
  • 4-5 leaves Tejapatta/bay leaves
  • 10 grams nutmeg/jaiphal
  • 10 grams Mace/javitri
  • 2 tbsp whole coriander
  • 2 tbsp poppy seeds (optional)
  • 2-3 pieces circle flowers
  • 10 grams pipalli/long pepper
  • 10 grams star anise
  • 10 grams dry ginger root
  • 6 pieces star anise
  • 8-10 pieces pipalli/long pepper

Instructions

  1. Clean all the whole spices and roast in a heavy bottom pan and roast it.

    foodaltime garam masala1
  2. Except for the nutmeg and cloves, put all the spices in the wok, roast for 2 minutes on low flame, until the sweetened aroma of the spices teases your nostrils.
  3. Now add spices to a plate, cool it.
  4. After cooling, add all spices including nutmeg and cloves to the mixer jar. And grind it finely.
  5. Sieve the ground mixture. Separate the thicker/larger spices and grind them again finely.
  6. Your FoodAllTime Garam Masala is ready.

Do You Know Your Spices?


Dry Ginger Root

The dry Ginger powder is also known as (Sonth/Soonth/Saunth) in Hindi.This comes from fresh ginger that is dried before being used. It is a fine off-white powder that has a strong aroma and pungent flavour. This is mostly easy to store and has a long shelf life of a year. Find out here what are the benefits of dry ginger powder. it is also used in spices and masalas for gravies, curries, marinades, stews etc. The dried ginger powder is used for adding flavour to a variety of baked dishes like ginger cookies and ginger candies. Like others, this too has tremendous medicinal properties.

Star Anise

Star anise is known to enhance the meat flavour and is an essential spice while preparing biryani and other masala items in the Indian subcontinent. It is used by confectioners instead of sweeteners. It blends well with the ingredients and imparts a sweetened flavor. It is used whole or as a powdered spice. It is also the dominant flavour in the five spice Chinese blend. It is used to lend a unique aroma to savoury dishes. As the name suggests, star anise is a fruit in the shape of a star.
It is brown in colour and has an aroma similar to that of a fennel seed. It has a strong licorice taste, more intense than regular anise. The fruits are picked up just before the harvest. Star anise contains an essential oil that is responsible for its flavour. Rust coloured and tough-skinned, they have widely used aromatic properties. If kept away from sunlight and stored in an airtight container, it can last up to a year. It has many medicinal values. it is regarded as a digestive aid, aids in relieving abdominal pain, cramps, indigestion, gas, bloating and nausea. Star anise contains diantheole and photoantheole which help to improve lactation in nursing mothers. The oil extracted from Star anise has been popularly used to cure acne and other skin related problems.

Black and White Peppercorns

foodaltime garam masala

Pepper loses flavour and aroma through evaporation, so airtight storage helps preserve its spiciness longer. Pepper can also lose flavour when exposed to light. One tablespoon (6 grams) of ground black pepper contains moderate amounts of vitamin K, iron and manganese, with trace amounts of other essential nutrients, protein and dietary fibre.

The nutrients in black pepper are what has given it a powerful culinary status. Black pepper aids in weight loss, and treats sinus, asthma, and nasal congestion.

It also reduces the risk of cancer, and heart and liver ailments. Black pepper also possesses antibacterial, antioxidant, immune-boosting, and fever-reducing properties. The pepper, according to studies, can also help individuals quit smoking. Peppercorns were an important trade good, and for this reason, they were also called ‘Black Gold’ and were used in the form of currency.

Cloves

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Cloves are flower buds that come from the clove tree. They have a spicy and pungent taste and are known for their anti-inflammatory and antidiabetic properties. Used often in Ayurvedic medicine, cloves are anti-fungal, antibacterial, antiseptic and analgesic.

They’re packed with antioxidants and are good sources of minerals (especially manganese), omega-3 fatty acids, fibre and vitamins. Temporarily treat a toothache, Relieve upper respiratory infections, Reduce inflammation, Treat scrapes and bruises, Stimulate Blood Circulation, Improve digestion, Enhance sexual health.

When plagued by chronic dry cough put a clove in your mouth and keep sucking on it till you get tired of it. You can then eat it and take your next meal. Taking 2 to 3 cloves per day should be fine. But this dosage may not be suitable for all. If you are very sensitive then it might cause blisters in your mouth

Mace

Mace is actually a spice made out of the waxy red covering which encompasses nutmeg seeds. The bright red lacy covering around the nutmeg seed. When removed and dried, mace becomes a yellow-orange colour. Typically sold ground; and when sold whole, it’s called a “blade.” Mace has a flavour and aroma similar to a pungent nutmeg.

Cinnamon or Cassia Bark

CINNAMON

It is a bark of a small evergreen tree. It has tremendous health powers like…it tames nausea and stomach ulcers; functions as a mild anti-inflammatory; increases insulin sensitivity to help focus fat burn. Cinnamon can be used in a daily dose by stirring into coffee/tea, mixing with yoghurt, oatmeal or any boxed cereal.

Nutmeg

It is the fruit of Myristica fragrans, an evergreen tree. It has tremendous health powers. It improves digestion; eases the symptoms of menstruation; induces calm and sleep. Grate a small amount into applesauce, kheer or plain yoghurt. (Note: It’s safe to grate the entire nut, which you can usually buy whole at the supermarket, but you never consume more than one nutmeg per day because too much of this potent spice can cause stomach pain, double vision and other uncomfortable reactions.)

Black and Green Cardamom Pods

It is a fruit of the Elettaria cardamomum plant in the ginger family. This spice also has great health powers. It eases belching, flatulence and indigestion; treats respiratory conditions like coughing, asthma and loss of voice; aids in the elimination of toxins through your skin. Stir a few freshly ground pinches of cardamom pods into your morning tea, or have it as a mouth freshener, paan, your morning fruit salad, or mix it with white or brown rice before you boil it.

Bay Leaf

These leaves have been a part of the culinary and medicinal world for thousands of years, dating back at least to Roman times. The most impressive health benefits of bay leaves include their ability to detoxify the body and protect it from bacterial infections.

It slows the ageing process, speeds wound healing, manages diabetes effectively, improves heart health, reduces inflammation, optimize digestion, and prevent certain types of cancer.

The uses of bay leaves include grinding the leaves into a spice to flavour soups and stews. Whole leaves are not commonly consumed.

Cumin

The health benefits of cumin include its ability to aid in digestion, improve immunity, and treat skin disorders and insomnia. It also helps treat anaemia, boils, cancer, and respiratory disorders such as asthma and bronchitis.  Cumin is an excellent source of iron, manganese, magnesium, calcium, phosphorus, and vitamin B1.

Other vitamins present in it include thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin A, C, E, K, and vitamin B6. Cumin contains minerals such as copper, zinc, and potassium. It is also rich in protein, amino acids, carbohydrates, dietary fibre, and a reasonable amount of fats and fatty acids. It is very low in saturated fats, sodium, and cholesterol.

Coriander

In addition, coriander leaves are rich in Vitamin C, Vitamin K and protein. They also contain small amounts of calcium, phosphorous, potassium, thiamin, niacin and carotene. Coriander lowers bad cholesterol (LDL) and increases the levels of good cholesterol (HDL). It is very good food for the digestive system.

It promotes liver functions and bowel movements, is good for diabetes patients, stimulates the insulin secretion and lowers the blood sugar levels. Vitamin K in it is good for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease.

The fat-soluble mineral and antioxidant- Vitamin A, found in it protects from lung and cavity cancers. It has antiseptic properties help to cure mouth ulcer and is good for the eyes too.

Recipe Notes


  • If you want to increase the taste of spices then fry the spices in ghee, add ½ teaspoon black salt and ¼ teaspoon asafoetida and 1 teaspoon amchur powder.
  • Grind it in a dry grinder.
  • Crush the nutmeg and dried ginger before adding to the mixer. We don’t want our mixer blades to break, do we? Do not roast cloves because the clove has oil in it.
  • Always store in a dry air-tight container.Crush the nutmeg and dried ginger before adding to the mixer. We don’t want our mixer blades to break, do we? Do not roast cloves because the clove has oil in it.
  • Now close the prepared garam masala in a glass utensil properly so that its flavour is preserved for a long time.
  • You can use prepare garam masala at home for 6 months.
  • Homemade hot masala is very good in taste, and even if you add less, the fragrance is very good and besides this makes vegetables and meat very tasty.
  • The flavours of the FoodAllTime Garam Masala should be carefully blended to achieve a balanced effect, or a single flavour may be emphasized.
  • A masala may be roasted before use to release its flavours and aromas and to prevent infestation of fungus or moulds. The components of the mix are roasted, ground together and then preserved in airtight containers…
Quick Overview
foodalltime garam masala

Recipe Name: How To Make FoodAllTime Garam Masala

Author: Ranjeeta Nath Ghai

Description: A step by step guide as to How To Make FoodAllTime Garam Masala. For my cooking, I prefer to make my own FoodAllTime Garam Masala. The aroma it lends to my cooking is simply awesome and I don’t need spoonfuls of it.

Preperation time: 10

Cook Time: 5

Total Time: 15

Type: herbs

Recipe Yield: 4-6 months

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